It doesn’t matter what you sell or market, you will eventually run into the concern of your potential customer saying, “I can’t afford it.” Thankfully when someone says this, it isn’t always a deal breaker. In this post we cover tips for dealing with the “I can’t afford it” concern while marketing door to door.

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“I can’t afford it” can come from any sort of neighborhood and from all kinds of potential customers

Unfortunately you can get this concern in all kinds of neighborhoods, and it could be a valid objection in many cases, but also a complete fabrication as well. That’s where the challenge comes in to play with this concern.

Certainly if you see a very high frequency of this concern in a particular neighborhood, you may be knocking in an area outside of the financial capabilities to purchase your offer, but in most cases, that won’t be the real reason for getting that concern. More often, you’ll get this concern from potential customers because of factors outside of them actually not being able to afford what you are offering.

One major reason for getting this concern from potential customers, is that you aren’t properly building value for what you have to offer. People love to buy, but hate to be sold.

When your potential customer doesn’t understand the value behind what you offer and why they are better off with buying what you sell, then they might feel sold, rather than wanting to buy of their own free will.

Your goal is to build value in what you offer and create a Black Friday sense of urgency, and your potential customer will feel like you are simply a messenger of good news, rather than someone just trying to sell them something.

Are you revealing the price to soon, or to a non-decision maker?

Another common reason you may get the “I can’t afford it” concern while marketing door to door is that you aren’t actually talking to a decision maker. When someone asks, “How much is it?” that can be a good sign they have at least some interest in buying, but if that person isn’t a decision maker, telling them the price could actually push you further away from the sale.

Often you can run into someone who isn’t a decision maker, but who wants to know the price and says they will pass on the information to the decision maker. Unfortunately, in most cases, all this potential customer does is pass along the price without building any value in the service.

When a potential customer is allowed to reveal the price to the decision maker without building value, the chances of that person buying goes to almost zero. Most people don’t buy on price alone, they buy on value. So without knowing the value of your offer most people won’t buy.

Even if you attempt to build value with a non-decision maker and have them ready to buy, rarely will that explanation and value build transfer effectively to the decision maker without you.

For this reason, we recommend not revealing the price to a non-decision making potential customer, or you might be stuck with the “I can’t afford it” objection.

Another tip for dealing with the “I can’t afford it” objection is to water down the price of your offer

Sometimes if you are dealing with products or services that come in a large quantity or yearly membership, it can seem expensive to some people. One way to avoid this feeling is to water down the price to make it more reasonable to your potential customer.

For example, you might offer a monthly lawn care service for $150 a month. To a potential customer that may sound like they can’t afford it, but when you water it down it really amounts to about $38 dollars a week, which seems much more economical.

You could explain, “Instead of spending hours trimming, mowing, treating, and caring for your lawn, you could spend that with your family. I’m sure $38 dollars a week would be worth it to you if you could get your weekends back wouldn’t it?”

In this scenario not only are you making the price of your offer sound more reasonable, you are also building more value for your potential customer. There are a lot of ways to water down the price, from cost per treatment, cost per use, cost per unit of product, etc.

You could even water down the price to a daily cost level. In that lawn care example, you could say something like, “Our service really breaks down to about $5 a day. That’s basically the cost of a coffee a day to get your weekends back and not have to worry about the hassles of taking care of your lawn anymore.”

When you only reveal the price to decision makers, build value in your offer, as well as water down the price when necessary, you’ll get better results when running into the “I can’t afford it” concern.

If you happen to be considering a new door-to-door sales opportunity you will certainly get the best training available as a part of the D2D Millionaire Team. Learn more about becoming a part of our team here!


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From time to time you’ll run into people who say they don’t want to purchase your product or service because they do it themselves. This may sound like a valid concern, but with the right approach and position of your products and services, you can still make sales when someone says this to you.

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Where to begin when selling to do-it-yourselfers while selling door to door

You might think that as soon as someone says they are a do-it-yourselfer, you are dead in the water, thankfully with the right approach you can still make sales when hearing this objection.

The first step to dealing with a DIY’er is to compliment them for understanding the value of needing your specific product or service. For example let’s say you market lawn care and someone says they do their own lawn care so they aren’t interested. You might say something like, “I can totally appreciate that you do your own lawn care, and that’s great that you already understand the value of taking care of your lawn. It’s good to know you realize that maintaining your lawn is important…”

After you compliment them for seeing the value in your product or service, then ask more questions

The next step after complimenting them for seeing the importance of your product or service, is to ask probing questions to gather more information. For example, you might ask a question like, “What products do you use currently to keep your lawn so green?”

Once you have more information about the products they currently use, or the activities they already do in relation to your service, you can start to show how your offer can supplement what they are doing.

Don’t bash what they are already doing

It might seem like a good idea to poke holes in what your do-it-yourselfer potential customer is doing, but that isn’t always the best strategy. You might prove that you are right, but you’ll probably lose the sale.

Your job isn’t to prove to them that what they are doing doesn’t work, even if that is the case, but to show how your products or service will supplement or upgrade what they are already doing.

Three areas to go over while selling to do-it-yourselfers

The first area you’ll want to cover is the effectiveness of your products or service. The products or services that your potential customer is using most likely is inferior in some way in effectiveness compared to the products or services you provide.

For example let’s say you market pest control. Your do-it-yourselfer potential customer probably buys pest control products over-the-counter and treats their home.

This is certainly better than not doing anything, but many of the over-the-counter products don’t leave a residual and are more contact kills. Meaning, if you directly sprayed the product on a pest it will likely kill it, but beyond that, the products don’t do much good.

The difference with professional pest control company’s products is that they can last months in some cases and continue to work as pests come in contact with the product.

With this being the case in this pest control example, you could explain to your potential customer, that what they are doing on their own will certainly help, but the addition of your service, can be even more effective by adding it onto what they do now.

The second area you’ll want to cover with a do-it-yourselfer is mentioning your product or service guarantee if you have one. Your guarantee could be a variety of different things.

For example, if you sold security systems, you might have a guarantee that if you do get burglarized, anything that is stolen will be replaced. If you sell lawn care services, you might guarantee to replace lawn or plants if they are over-fertilized.

Again, the guarantee you offer could vary from product or service, but as long as you have some type of guarantee, that’s more than your customer will get by returning an empty bag of product back to the store.

The third area you want to mention to a do-it-yourselfer is that time is money. A major resource none of us can get more of is time.

When your product or service offers valuable time savings, this should be a primary factor you mention to your potential customer.

Potential customers should realize there is going to be a trade off by sacrificing their time to perform the service you offer. For example, even with something as simple as mowing lawns, it could take an hour or more of your potential customers time to mow their lawn.

What is an hour of time worth to your potential customer? Is 4 hours a month more time to spend with their kids, worth it to pay you for your service to save them that time?

What about in actual dollars? Let’s say your potential customer has a very high paying job and they could earn $100 an hour. Would it be worth it to them to sacrifice their working hours with something they could pay someone less than $100 an hour to perform?

If not, there is a good chance they would rather be a customer of yours for the time savings alone, versus trying to do it themselves.

Overall, when you position your offer correctly, do-it-yourselfers can be some of your best customers. They already believe in what your product and service offers, you just need to show them the value of why they should be your customer in addition to (or in place of) doing it themselves.

If you happen to be considering a new door-to-door sales opportunity you will certainly get the best training available as a part of the D2D Millionaire Team. Learn more about becoming a part of our team here!


Did This Blog Help You? If so, we would greatly appreciate if you could comment below and share on Facebook

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P.S. If you haven’t done so yet, be sure to Download our Free Podcast on “How To Avoid The Top 5 Reasons Door-to-Door Sales Reps Fail” Click Here For Instant Access!

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Often we see door-to-door sales reps struggle with transitioning into the value build and close. In this post we are going cover a simple conversational closing technique for selling door to door.

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Closing starts with your initial approach in door-to-door sales

An aspect a lot of sales reps have a problem with is their initial approach. The initial approach can either make or break the sale, and doing your initial approach effectively, can have a big impact on the effectiveness of your close.

Most potential customers you’ll approach tend to have their guards up when they first answer the door. Having an effective initial greeting can help to alleviate some of this apprehension your potential customers may be feeling.

A great way to approach someone on the doors is to make some sort of genuine complement or comment based on an observation about them, their home, or their surroundings. For example, if there were kid’s toys in the yard you could make a comment about the kids being out of school and what they are going to do to keep busy this summer.

Or, if you notice they have a dog, or maybe the dog barks as you ring the doorbell, you could make a playful comment such as, “That’s an interesting sounding doorbell you have there, it sounds like a dog barking.”

The key is to have some sort of lighthearted icebreaker that can cut some of the tension, and can position you as a messenger of good news, rather than an unwanted salesperson. When you come off as someone that’s just delivering a great offer and something that can help your potential customer, it will lead to more sales.

Your initial approach should quickly have an icebreaker and answer the questions of who you are, why you are there, and what you are offering. Answer these in your initial approach and you’ll have a much easier time closing.

A simple and effective conversational close for selling door to door

If you happen to be at a loss for words after your initial approach, a simple transition is to move into a conversational close. Basically a conversational close is asking a question that can gather more information from your potential customer to see if they qualify for your offer, without directly asking them to buy.

A great conversation close you can use in many industries is asking something along the lines of, “Where are you guys from?” or “When was your home built?” or “How old is your home?”

Finding out the age of the home or how long someone has been living in it can give you a lot of options and ways to position your offer as beneficial to your potential customer.

For example, if you found out your potential customer’s home was brand new, and you sold pest control, you could say something along the lines of, “I’m sure you aren’t seeing much in the way of pest activity now since your home is brand new, and that’s exactly why we are here, to help you keep it that way.”

If the homeowner has been in their home for 10-15 years, you can mention aspects of how your product or service benefits homes of that age. For example, if you sold security systems you might say something along the lines of, “As you know, the quality, security and technology of door locks has greatly improved in the past few years, and while you might not have experienced any break-ins at this point, thieves are starting to target homes in your age range as the locks tend to be easier to pick and gain access to…”

Finally, if the home is in the older range of being over 20+ years old, it can fall into a category of needing upgrades and repairs. In this case you might be selling roofing and could say something along the lines of, “As I’m sure you are aware, as your home ages, the roof can take a beating from storms and simple wear and tear. This can cause an increase in heating costs as well as the likelihood for leaks and other damage. The quality of roofing has also improved in the past few decades and we are offering a special discount to homes that are 20+ years old because we’ll be in your area…”

Overall, having a successful initial approach followed up with a conversational close, and asking about the age of their home can give you a lot of options to lead successfully into a sale. Focus on developing a few logical reasons someone would benefit from your product or service for each age range and you’ll greatly increase your sales production.

If you happen to be considering a new door-to-door sales opportunity you will certainly get the best training available as a part of the D2D Millionaire Team. Learn more about becoming a part of our team here!


Did This Blog Help You? If so, we would greatly appreciate if you could comment below and share on Facebook

Facebook: www.facebook.com/d2dmillionaire/

P.S. If you haven’t done so yet, be sure to Download our Free Podcast on “How To Avoid The Top 5 Reasons Door-to-Door Sales Reps Fail” Click Here For Instant Access!

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